www.flickr.com

Universal Design for Learning in the DP

My most recent article has been posted over on the OSC IB Blogs siteUniversal Design for Learning in the DP;  I've re-posted it below.
Visit the OSC-IB Blogs site and explore the posts on other areas of interest for students and for teachers.


__________________________________

This morning I read a brief blog post by  titled More Universal Design for Learning (UDL) needed in the IB, which I quote here in it's entirety, as the author has asked that readers share the link :
"I just finished reading a summary on the need to employ more UDL in IB schools. One of the main challenges for the DP is the very nature of the limited assessment format... which is under pressure from higher education's limited assessment format. Here is a great list of digital tools to help bring more UDL into your classrooms."
The link is https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1ihsTwYr1kFx9Jb08Z2w5i1MWoxYkRXZbTP4Gcbodp6I/edit?pref=2&pli=1#gid=0  (You might want to add this spreadsheet to your Google Drive, and subscribe to changes on it.)
flickr photo by JakubSolovsky 
https://flickr.com/photos/jakubsolovsky/8606087394 
shared under a Creative Commons (BY) license

The IB's Programme Standards and Practices which relate directly to Universal Design for Learning are
  • A:9 the school supports access for students to the IB programme(s) and the philosophy.
  • B2:8 the school provides support for its students with learning and/or special educational needs and supports their teachers.
  • C1:6 Collaborative planning and reflection incorporates differentiation for students’ learning needs and styles.
  • C3:10 Teaching and learning differentiates instruction to meet students’ learning needs and styles.
If you would like to read further about this area of teaching and learning, I recommend 

Research summary Universal design for learning (UDL) and inclusive practices in IB World Schools, Summary developed by the IB Research department based on a report prepared by: Kavita Rao, Rachel Currie-Rubin and Chiara Logli CAST Professional Learning,  July 2016 

Learning diversity in the International Baccalaureate programmes: Special educational needs within the International Baccalaureate. IBO, August 2010. 

The IB guide to inclusive education: a resource for whole school development, IB Publishing, IBO. 

"Why every school should care about inclusive education", Jayne Pletser, and Kala Parasuram. The IB Community Blog. IBO, 27 Feb. 2015. 

 If you are inspired to expand your own experience in this field, I recommend the page of free learning tools at this link created by  CAST :
"As part of its barrier-busting mission, CAST offers a number of robust (and free) learning tools.These tools, designed and tested as part of CAST’s research projects, help educators, parents, and students experience the power of flexible learning environments."

Digital Intelligence

My most recent article has been posted over on the OSC IB Blogs site: Digital Intelligence;  I've re-posted it below.
Visit the OSC-IB Blogs site and explore the posts on other areas of interest for students and for teachers.

__________________________________

The other day on the World Economic Forum website, this post in the Human implications of digital media department caught my eye: 8 digital skills we must teach our children.  The title would be of interest to anyone involved in the use ICT in education, but it was the image I especially appreciated.  It beautifully represents as a collection (and it is huge!) the technology-related ideals and skills that educators have been naming and discussing for decades. Author Yuhyun Park describes "Digital Intelligence" as "the set of social, emotional and cognitive abilities that enable individuals to face the challenges and adapt to the demands of digital life. These abilities can broadly be broken down into eight interconnected areas:
Digital Intelligence © infollutionZERO Foundation
Digital identity: The ability to create and manage one’s online identity and reputation. This includes an awareness of one's online persona and management of the short-term and long-term impact of one's online presence.

Digital use: The ability to use digital devices and media, including the mastery of control in order to achieve a healthy balance between life online and offline.

Digital safety: The ability to manage risks online (e.g. cyberbullying, grooming, radicalization) as well as problematic content (e.g. violence and obscenity), and to avoid and limit these risks.

Digital security: The ability to detect cyber threats (e.g. hacking, scams, malware), to understand best practices and to use suitable security tools for data protection.

Digital emotional intelligence: The ability to be empathetic and build good relationships with others online.

Digital communication: The ability to communicate and collaborate with others using digital technologies and media.

Digital literacy: The ability to find, evaluate, utilize, share and create content as well as competency in computational thinking.

Digital rights: The ability to understand and uphold personal and legal rights, including the rights to privacy, intellectual property, freedom of speech and protection from hate speech."

However, I feel that the author does us a great disservice by talking only about children in this context, "Experts are predicting that 90% of the entire population will be connected to the internet within 10 years. With the internet of things, the digital and physical worlds will soon be merged. These changes herald exciting possibilities. But they also create uncertainty. And our kids are at the centre of this dynamic change." I think that we are all at the centre of change - all of us Internet users.  The parallel in schools is teaching students "responsible Internet use" and leaving the teachers to their own devices.

It is not just children who need to learn how to deal with the digital world - every day the news media relays stories of people (and increasingly, their institutions) of all ages who have chosen less than clever passwords, been hacked, bullied, trolled, who have shown dubious judgement, etc., on one digital platform or another.  The central character in this video should be an "any age" being:



I clicked through to the DQProject website to find out more, which I will leave you to do for yourself, and make your own evaluation of what you find there.

A Framework for Literacy

My most recent article has been posted over on the OSC IB Blogs siteA Framework for Information Literacy;  I've re-posted it below.
Visit the OSC-IB Blogs site and explore the posts on other areas of interest for students and for teachers.
__________________________________

Presentation slide. 
Photo in the public domain from 
https://pixabay.com/en/read-reading-book-reader-education-1342499/

I follow the Librarians forum on the ECIS moodle, where I read with great interest a recent post by Teacher - Librarian Pia Alliende, in which she shares the recently published (January 2016)  Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education published by the US Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. She writes about the document that "...it revises the more traditional definition of information literacy and I see on it all of the MYP ATL skills, and not just one of the 5 approaches to learning (Research). The framework is based on essential concepts and questions drawn by the work of Wiggins and McTighe (Understanding by Design, 2004)".
I have just been thinking about the  Middle Years Program  Approaches to Learning skill clusters with a colleague, and I have been researching how the Approaches to Learning  are developing in the other IB programs.  This ACRL document will be a great help in discussions, and curriculum development.
"The Framework is organized into six frames, each consisting of a concept central to information literacy, a set of knowledge practices, and a set of dispositions. The six concepts that anchor the frames are presented alphabetically:
  • Authority Is Constructed and Contextual
  • Information Creation as a Process
  • Information Has Value
  • Research as Inquiry
  • Scholarship as Conversation
  • Searching as Strategic Exploration
Neither the knowledge practices nor the dispositions that support each concept are intended to prescribe what local institutions should do in using the Framework; each library and its partners on campus will need to deploy these frames to best fit their own situation, including designing learning outcomes. For the same reason, these lists should not be considered exhaustive." (ACRL, Introduction, parr. 2)
I will reproduce here one of the concepts, and it's knowledge practices and dispositions, with the hope that they will so enthuse you that you will click on the link, read the whole document, download it, and refer to it often.

Research as Inquiry

Research is iterative and depends upon asking increasingly complex or new questions whose answers in turn develop additional questions or lines of inquiry in any field.
Experts see inquiry as a process that focuses on problems or questions in a discipline or between disciplines that are open or unresolved. Experts recognize the collaborative effort within a discipline to extend the knowledge in that field. Many times, this process includes points of disagreement where debate and dialogue work to deepen the conversations around knowledge. This process of inquiry extends beyond the academic world to the community at large, and the process of inquiry may focus upon personal, professional, or societal needs. The spectrum of inquiry ranges from asking simple questions that depend upon basic recapitulation of knowledge to increasingly sophisticated abilities to refine research questions, use more advanced research methods, and explore more diverse disciplinary perspectives. Novice learners acquire strategic perspectives on inquiry and a greater repertoire of investigative methods.

Knowledge Practices

Learners who are developing their information literate abilities
  • formulate questions for research based on information gaps or on reexamination of existing, possibly conflicting, information;
  • determine an appropriate scope of investigation;
  • deal with complex research by breaking complex questions into simple ones, limiting the scope of investigations;
  • use various research methods, based on need, circumstance, and type of inquiry;
  • monitor gathered information and assess for gaps or weaknesses;
  • organize information in meaningful ways;
  • synthesize ideas gathered from multiple sources;
  • draw reasonable conclusions based on the analysis and interpretation of information.

Dispositions

Learners who are developing their information literate abilities
  • consider research as open-ended exploration and engagement with information;
  • appreciate that a question may appear to be simple but still disruptive and important to research;
  • value intellectual curiosity in developing questions and learning new investigative methods;
  • maintain an open mind and a critical stance;
  • value persistence, adaptability, and flexibility and recognize that ambiguity can benefit the research process;
  • seek multiple perspectives during information gathering and assessment;
  • seek appropriate help when needed;
  • follow ethical and legal guidelines in gathering and using information;
  • demonstrate intellectual humility (i.e., recognize their own intellectual or experiential limitations).
http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards/ilframework
and
http://acrl.ala.org/framework/